THE POWER OF PRINT

On Creating a Time Capsule

Share on Pinterest Share via email
Photo by Daeja Fallas of tulip in the sun

In unprecedented times, we turn to stories, seeking solace in their imprint. This is the power of photography: a means of processing in the now… a medium for reflection when it's all over. We preserve our many moments in the form of images — tales of trial, tribulation, and triumph — making time capsules with every click of the shutter. They become reminders of love and endurance, created with the knowledge that they will one day guide our way.

Right now, the path may not be clear. But we document today's uncertainty with the hope that it will bring tomorrow's perspective. And we share our experiences, looking for meaningful connection in the face of collective struggle.

Months ago, four of our favorite photographers were kind enough to share their own experiences — stories of heart and humanity written in the solitude of April's quarantine. Here, we look back on those stories, finding resilience in the steps we've taken since and lessons for those still to come.


@michellegardella

Michelle Gardella

Photo by Michelle Gardella of woman bending down to grab something with light shining at the end of the aisle


“When she greeted me without a smile, I knew right away she was my kind of lady. A deadend dirt road lined by overgrown cacti. A donkey named Dilbert, snacking on burnt Texas grass. Ceramics supplies stretching 5 acres, planted in the ground like tombstones, weathered and forgotten. When the quarantine began, I had no idea I’d end up meeting Glenda, my new 78-year-old friend, or that her home would become my refuge in the chaos of a pandemic banging down my door. I bring her brisket sandwiches and she brings me endless joy. Pottery lessons and walks through overgrown wildflower fields, the perfect escape from the noise of normalcy, lost.”


Photo by Michelle Gardella of potter in her studio
Photo by Michelle Gardella of potter acrobatically grabbing something from kiln
Photo by Michelle Gardella of potter proudly holding up her work and smiling

I bring her brisket sandwiches and she brings me endless joy.

@daejafallas

Daeja Fallas

Photo by Daeja Fallas of tulip in the sun


“I, like all of us, have good days and bad. It's a lot to manage two small children in this time and support their needs alone. These photos were made after a trip to the market, when my four-year-old said, 'mom, look at those flowers — they look like suns.' So we bought them. The next morning we were up very early and brought the tulips outside, where we made these images. They feel hopeful to me.”

Photo by Daeja Fallas of tulip in the sun from another angle

Mom, look at those flowers — they look like suns.

@melissagaylephoto

Melissa Gayle

Photo by Melissa Gayle of CSA worker with mask standing next to produce washtub


“This virus has taught me unshakeable lessons. The first weeks of Covid blanketed my world like a thick fog. I felt like I was driving a car with my eyes closed. Grocery shelves were depleted.

Over the coming weeks, the local farm became my haven both creatively and spiritually. Their small business model shifted gears quickly, creating a CSA pickup which has since distributed over four thousand boxes of fresh produce to our community!

I have experienced a mix of emotions in quarantine — both inspired and clearer than ever on the importance of living locally. This photo of Amanda captures the solitude of the moment: a distance and simultaneous connectivity that embodies these times.”

Photo by Melissa Gayle of CSA worker picking flowers

Blurred photo by Melissa Gayle of CSA worker walking out of the building
Group photo by Melissa Gayle of CSA workers with masks next to produce boxes
A distance and simultaneous connectivity that embodies these times.

@ashleykelemen

Ashley Kelemen

Self-portrait of Ashley Kelemen sipping coffee


“This pandemic has taught me to make space for a constant paradox in myself. There is fear for the wellbeing of others alongside immense gratitude for my own life and safety. There is boiling rage over the imbalance and injustice showing up throughout the world, existing with intense gentleness toward myself and my loved ones as we navigate this. There is frustration over a lack of individual productivity, but an overwhelming pride for having faced the shadows while keeping a face toward the window. The contradiction keeps us all human, and I've never felt more human than in this strange moment in time.”

Self-portrait of Ashley Kelemen

I've never felt more human than in this strange moment in time.

Share Your Own Stories

Because connection and community are all the more important right now.



Share on Pinterest Share via email